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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Accenting my playing


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.flatpickerhangout.com/archive/5446

Debby - Posted - 10/20/2008:  05:22:54


I'm pretty much in the start of my learning process of bluegrass and have learned some of the basic songs and runs in G C and D. Now I'm trying to accent with my strums and hammer ons, but trying to figure out where all to put my hammer ons in these basic songs to make it sound nice. Can any of you help me with accenting my playing?

"When I hear the music, all my troubles just fade away"

Brent361 - Posted - 10/20/2008:  06:45:05


Listen and watch others. Just experiment. Combine them with pulloffs. Makes it sound like your playing much faster than you are. Let it flow so you develope your own style.

cibby54 - Posted - 10/22/2008:  15:57:49


Why not try and look at the tabs for your songs they'll show you the hammer on and pull offs.That gives you a start. Try "The Bluegrass Guitar Homepage" they have some pretty easy tabs they show you hammer on's,pull offs plus how to cross pick the song. Some great standard bluegrass songs also that every one knows. I still go there once in a while to brush up on my cross picking...

Debby - Posted - 10/24/2008:  07:10:18


Thanks

"When I hear the music, all my troubles just fade away"

Brian T - Posted - 10/26/2008:  13:48:55


I sure that this is no insight for many inhabitants of the FPHO. I've recently discovered that the second note in a Hammer or a Slide or a Pull-Off is the melody note that I would otherwise play. I've begun to experiment, trying them, and pencil some into music books for the added sound.

"Keep Your Eyes On The Horizon" (K.T. Oslin)

bryankimsey - Posted - 10/30/2008:  07:06:44


quote:
Originally posted by Brent361

Listen and watch others. Just experiment. Combine them with pulloffs. Makes it sound like your playing much faster than you are. Let it flow so you develope your own style.




What he said.

MitchellB - Posted - 11/01/2008:  06:07:52


All good ideas. I think the simple fact that you are consciously wanting to accent some notes or strums more than others puts you way ahead of the game of the dynamics of your playing. Kudos! Personally I listen for empty spots in a song, or perhaps where the singer breathes between words to push the song a little bit. But be tasteful, you can over do it. So much of guitar playing, like most instruments in bluegrass are all about timing and drive. If I feel the song wavering or someone falling behind, I try to ramp up the power in my playing a notch (especially the down beats and/or the one beat) to help everyone stay on track.

Mitchell

Fretmentor - Posted - 11/08/2008:  17:27:39


Hi Debby

When working on the dynamics of your playing, I advise my students to accent the melody line of a song and play the strum evenly and softly.

As for rhythm, start accenting the alternating bass notes and softly play your strum. Many beginners play their strum way too loud. You also can accent the hammer-ons and pull offs.

Dynamics (learning to play softly in areas and louder in certain areas) will improve over time with practice. A good way to develop the technique is to play a scale and attempt to accent every other not or every third note. Then, when you are prepared to play a melody line, you will learn to do the same.

Good luck.

Dave
fretmentor.com

Debby - Posted - 11/09/2008:  06:29:03


quote:
Originally posted by Fretmentor

Hi Debby

When working on the dynamics of your playing, I advise my students to accent the melody line of a song and play the strum evenly and softly.

As for rhythm, start accenting the alternating bass notes and softly play your strum. Many beginners play their strum way too loud. You also can accent the hammer-ons and pull offs.

Dynamics (learning to play softly in areas and louder in certain areas) will improve over time with practice. A good way to develop the technique is to play a scale and attempt to accent every other not or every third note. Then, when you are prepared to play a melody line, you will learn to do the same.

Good luck.

Dave
fretmentor.com



Thank you and ALL the replies.......I'm wanting to be a proficient rhythm player and yep, just starting this in the last 6 months or so, and at times my fingers want to just feel those strings as they have done for so long. Need all the help I can get....lol. Thinking I may go back into my lessons for this soon. I DO need to be sculpted...lol.

"When I hear the music, all my troubles just fade away"

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