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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Becoming a picker.


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.flatpickerhangout.com/archive/48998

Caribbean Cowboy - Posted - 03/21/2018:  15:07:03


Looking for advice. Learning Chords and strumming is I guess the base for everything. If not tell me what is? lol Wondering if there is a direction of instructions that I should look into to help me get into picking. Any knowledge of books, DVD's Video youtubers etc is appreciated. Thanks

wannabedoc - Posted - 03/21/2018:  15:46:18


There's a lot of stuff out there, and everyone probably has a different set of favorites, but I've gotten a lot of mileage out of Steve Kaufman's materials. Every teacher is working with the same information, so I think it's important to find someone who teaches in a way you like. For me, SK's books/DVDs are a good fit, because they get you playing real tunes, rather than drills, lessons, and assignments. Once you learn a tune, you've got something you can play in front of someone -- or with someone.



Here are a few of his things you might want to check out:



melbay.com/Products/20793BCD/m...ongs.aspx (he's also got My First Blues, My First Gospel, and My First Country books, as well. Audio tracks are included.)



melbay.com/Products/94562EB/co...book.aspx (Audio tracks included. I worked through this and liked it pretty well, although I had already been playing guitar for awhile when I bought it.)



flatpik.com/instructional-dvds...hm-guitar (Comes with a PDF file. I have this one, too, and think it's pretty good once you know a few chords)



 



Hope this helps!

 

Uncle Brad - Posted - 03/21/2018:  16:50:02


I have completed several on-line semesters with Steve Kaufman, rhythm and lead. He now has a free introductory lesson to see is this is right for you. I would recommend giving it a try. Here's some info copied from Steve's web page:

flatpik.com/online-lessons

Free Beginner Guitar Lesson With Steve Kaufman
Saturdays
March 31
12 noon to 1pm Eastern Time
Click Here to Register and for more information

Follow this link to the Log Me In site - our internet platform. This is a Beginner Class for first time users to get started on Rhythm and Lead Flatpicking.
Fill out the registration. There is no fee for this class.
We look forward to getting you started playing guitar.

Caribbean Cowboy - Posted - 03/21/2018:  19:10:13


quote:

Originally posted by wannabedoc

There's a lot of stuff out there, and everyone probably has a different set of favorites, but I've gotten a lot of mileage out of Steve Kaufman's materials. Every teacher is working with the same information, so I think it's important to find someone who teaches in a way you like. For me, SK's books/DVDs are a good fit, because they get you playing real tunes, rather than drills, lessons, and assignments. Once you learn a tune, you've got something you can play in front of someone -- or with someone.



Here are a few of his things you might want to check out:



melbay.com/Products/20793BCD/m...ongs.aspx (he's also got My First Blues, My First Gospel, and My First Country books, as well. Audio tracks are included.)



melbay.com/Products/94562EB/co...book.aspx (Audio tracks included. I worked through this and liked it pretty well, although I had already been playing guitar for awhile when I bought it.)



flatpik.com/instructional-dvds...hm-guitar (Comes with a PDF file. I have this one, too, and think it's pretty good once you know a few chords)



 



Hope this helps!

Thank you so much...this def will give me some direction...



Much appreciated Doc!!  JT






 

UsuallyPickin - Posted - 03/22/2018:  05:56:06


Well then .... Chords and strumming are muscle memory not so much where and how to use them, that's theory, but to get to the point where when music calls for a G chord your hand doesn't have to be told how and where it just knows. That requires repetition on a daily basis. Rhythm is much the same in that you practice patterns so you can play what you hear. Part of this is theory, what works where, but it is mostly practice which, keep in mind, is called playing. The Kaufman materials are well produced informative and a good place to start. The Kamps he puts on in June are top flight. Playing music with friends and family is a pleasure in it's own league. Enjoy the journey. R/

Caribbean Cowboy - Posted - 03/29/2018:  18:14:26


Thank you...good advice.

bleugrassboy - Posted - 03/29/2018:  22:06:42


To add to all the excellent advice that's been giving above, I began watching Steve Kaufman's Figuring Out the Fretboard video some time ago, and he opens that lesson with some great advice that I'm currently taking to heart and applying: He said, in essence, that you can learn all the positions, tricks and practice techniques for becoming a better improvising musician, but nothing takes the place of actually learning and practicing a good plethora of tunes which give a solid foundation for flatpicking technique and fingerboard knowledge. Specifically, he stated that knowing at least 50 fiddle tunes on the guitar in their various keys will put you well on your way to becoming a master improvisor. This made sense to me since, if you think about it, fiddle tunes are just note-for-note, scale-based melodic arpeggios. I shut the video off right there, pulled out my guitar and went to work. I'm little more than a 10th of the way there. I'll revisit the video when I'm done. It's taking a bit of time, since I am working out each tune myself (as opposed to using tab) and working up a melody solo and one off-melody solo for each tune.

wannabedoc - Posted - 03/31/2018:  22:07:58


That's where I'm at, too -- trying to work through Phase One of Figuring Out the Fingerboard. I would have met my 50-fiddle-tune goal a long time ago if I'd stuck to my original plan of learning one tune per week, but I let myself get distracted by other things (other instruments, other styles of music, and just plain not playing very much for weeks in a row). I've got about 15 tunes to go, and am back on track again. Let's git 'er done!


Edited by - wannabedoc on 03/31/2018 22:09:30

wannabedoc - Posted - 03/31/2018:  22:19:23


quote:

Originally posted by Caribbean Cowboy

Looking for advice. Learning Chords and strumming is I guess the base for everything. If not tell me what is? lol Wondering if there is a direction of instructions that I should look into to help me get into picking. Any knowledge of books, DVD's Video youtubers etc is appreciated. Thanks






Here's another one for you -- just in case you haven't found anything to start with yet. The first 5 minutes is an introduction, and the playing starts after that. 



youtube.com/watch?v=rIDUH9fSAzo



Keep us posted when you have time, and let us know how it's going. There is so much out there that it's easy to let yourself get paralyzed by it all, thinking you have to get The Right Thing. However, the most important thing is not what you choose . . . it's what you use. Do what you can with what you have, where you are. If you just play as much as you can, you'll figure it out.


Edited by - wannabedoc on 03/31/2018 22:19:57

Caribbean Cowboy - Posted - 04/01/2018:  05:34:48


Thanks Doc!!

UsuallyPickin - Posted - 04/03/2018:  03:49:13


Chords into rhythm learn to hum the melody then play it. That is "it" in a nutshell. Solid rhythm with on the dot chord changes is always welcome. Learning the tones to walk into the chord change comes next. Listen to a good bass player. Then comes learning the melody of fiddle tunes and or any standards tunes. Think of tunes or songs as words phrases and paragraphs in a conversation. The more you know how to play the more you have to say. Keep it simple , work in some right hand technique with cross picking and syncopation. Practice major and minor scales in the chord groups they work together in. Check out pentatonic scales ands flatting the third and seventh scale tones to add that bluesy sound. Play daily and the dexterity to accomplish what you want will come. Keep in mind that speed comes with knowing what you are going to play. Lastly learn and understand some music theory ,,,, what works and what doesn't where and when. Be patient and enjoy the process.
R/

n6xrf - Posted - 04/03/2018:  09:39:50


I am also learning the guitar, my wife and I have been taking classes and private lessons for about a year. I would like to be proficient in flat picking. In several comments above, it is mentioned to try and learn one song per week. I like the idea of doing this, so at the end of a year I would know 50 songs, or at the end of 2018 I would know about 40 songs. Is there a list of commons songs to learn, and the best order to learn them, maybe easiest to hardest.

I did purchase the 2 melbay products listed above. I only received DVD's. Was there supposed to be a book also?

I also purchased Old-Time Backup Guitar: Learn From the Masters, suggested by my banjo instructor

I am not sure about everyone else, but I seem to have enough practice time. My full time job get in the way of my guitar and banjo practice time. If I could just figure out to to pay bills without an income

Also looking for guitar workshops near Los Angeles, CA

Mike

wannabedoc - Posted - 04/04/2018:  20:20:08


Hi, Mike --



When it comes to which tunes to learn, it depends on whether you mean instrumentals or vocal tunes. Either way, it's probably best to go with tunes you like, although -- if you plan to play with other people -- there are some that are more well-known than others.



At the risk of sounding like a Steve Kaufman infomercial, I always recommend his books and DVDs because I've used them and learned a lot from them. His Parking Lot Picker series will get you started with well-known tunes you can play at jams, and he teaches each tune with beginner, intermediate, and advanced versions. Volumes 1,2, and 4 are all fiddle tunes (instrumentals), while Volume 3 has solos you can play on vocal tunes. Other volumes deal with gospel and swing music, but #1-4 are full of things that everyone should know.



Even if you don't want to get the books, a glance at the list of tunes on each volume will give you a good idea of what you can work on to build a solid repertoire.

n6xrf - Posted - 04/16/2018:  14:17:15


I was on Steve Kaufman's Flatpik website and saw this:
flatpik.com/instructional-dvds...3-dvd-set

Learn to Flatpick - 3 DVD Bundle
A Complete Course in Bluegrass Guitar

Buy the Bundle and Save $20.00, each book is $30.00 or all three for $70.00

Three-DVD set, includes music and tab booklets
Level: All

Does any know if this is maybe a new version of what was listed above?

Mike

n6xrf - Posted - 04/16/2018:  14:18:37


Has anyone attended the Steve Kaufman workshop

flatpik.com/announcements/temp...ots-total

Mike

kjcole - Posted - 04/20/2018:  10:46:39


Dan Miller's Flatpicking Essentials series should be mentioned also

flatpick.com/category_s/1844.htm



and Bryan Sutton's course on Artistworks also should be mentioned even if the only thing a beginner gets is efficient and relaxed right hand and left hand mechanics/posture.


Edited by - kjcole on 04/20/2018 10:50:03

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